Readings that’ll get read

I haven’t really talked about readings yet in this series on syllabus development, and that is no accident. It’s too easy to overfill a course, or base a course around readings instead of the other way around. If you’re an English prof, it may make sense to have book(s) at the heart of what you …

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It’s not you, it’s me.

  I’ve established before that I am an unapologetic early-adopter-fan-girl-nerd. I love new technotoys. Over the past few weeks, I’ve tested a couple, with surprising (for me) outcomes. Here’s my review of the first. I’ve been seeing the livescribe pen in class pretty regularly for at least a year now. When I saw it, I …

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The Importance of Padding

Snow day. Email server down. Flooding in the computer lab. Broken projector. Murphy’s Law is one of the realities of teaching. One time I completely lost my voice before an important class and had to lecture entirely without speaking. It took a custom-made presentation and lots of pantomime, but it worked. I can’t really teach …

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The Long and Short of Robert Moses

Urban planning has an antichrist. His name is Robert Moses. He was larger than life: he built parks, roads, and a ton of buildings all around New York State, was in power for over 40 years, and for a while held over a dozen offices. Why antichrist? Well, when it came to NYC, he served …

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